Solar Wind

Morphology of Pseudostreamers and Solar Wind Properties

Comments Off on Morphology of Pseudostreamers and Solar Wind Properties 01 May 2016

Abstract

The solar dynamo and photospheric convection lead to three main types of structures extending from the solar surface into the corona – active regions, solar filaments (prominences when observed at the limb) and coronal holes. These structures exist over a wide range of scales, and are interlinked with each other in evolution and dynamics. Active regions can form clusters of magnetic activity and the strongest overlie sunspots. In the decay of active regions, the boundaries separating opposite magnetic polarities (neutral lines) develop the specific structures called filament channels above which filaments form. In the presence of flux imbalance decaying active regions can also give birth to lower latitude coronal holes. The accumulation of magnetic flux at coronal hole boundaries also creates the conditions for filament formation: polar crown filaments are permanently present at the boundaries of the polar coronal holes. Middle-latitude and equatorial coronal holes – the result of active region evolution – can create pseudostreamers (PSs) if other coronal holes of the same polarity are present. While helmet streamers form between open fields of opposite polarities, the pseudostreamer, characterized by a smaller coronal imprint, typically shows a more prominent straight ray or stalk extending from the corona. The pseudostreamer base at photospheric heights is multipolar; often one observes tripolar magnetic configurations with two neutral lines – where filaments can form – separating the coronal holes. Here we discuss the specific role of filament channels on pseudostreamer topology and on solar wind properties. 1D numerical analysis of PSs shows that the properties of the solar wind from around PSs depend on the presence/absence of filament channels, number of channels and chirality at the PS base low in the corona.

Solar Wind

Coronal Pseudostreamers: Source of Fast or Slow Solar Wind?

Comments Off on Coronal Pseudostreamers: Source of Fast or Slow Solar Wind? 13 June 2013

Abstract

We discuss observations of pseudostreamers and their 3D magnetic configuration as reconstructed with potential field source surface (PFSS)models to study their contribution to the solar wind. To understand the outflow from pseudostreamers the 3D expansion factor must be correctly estimated. Pseudostreamers may contain filament channels at their base in which case the open field lines diverge more strongly and the corresponding greater expansion factors lead to slower wind outflow, compared with pseudostreamers in which filament channels are absent. In the neighborhood of pseudostreamers the expansion factor does not increase monotonically with distance from the sun, and doesn’t simply depend on the height of the pseudostreamer null point but on the entire magnetic field configuration.

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Featured Publications

  2016 (1)
Rapid Reconnection and Field Line Topology. Parker, E.; and Rappazzo, A. In Gonzalez, W.; and Parker, E., editor(s), Astrophysics and Space Science Library, volume 427, pages 181, 2016.
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  2015 (1)
Observations and Analysis of the Non-Radial Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections Near the Sun. Liewer, P.; Panasenco, O.; Vourlidas, A.; and Colaninno, R. \solphys, 290: 3343-3364. November 2015.
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  2014 (1)
Apparent Solar Tornado-Like Prominences. Panasenco, O.; Martin, S.; and Velli, M. \solphys, 289: 603-622. February 2014.
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